Back in Business: 20×200

29 April 2014

Last October, I wrote one of the balliest cover letter’s in the history of (wo)man to 20×200, an affordable art website geared toward empowering  artists and making their art affordable to collectors.  I worked day + night on this letter, peppering it with humorous self depreciation to lighten the mood while simultaneously highlighting my business acumen and demonstrating my career achievements. I wanted to stand out! 20×200 was widely considered a leader in the online art startup scene, producing more than 200,000 prints by more than 200 artists, including stars like Don Oehl and William Wegman. Safe to say, I was quite proud of this cover letter and felt I was the best match for the job (in my humble opinion.)

The minute I pushed send with my PDF-only resume attached (as strictly requested) I was confident it would be mere hours, days at most, till I’d hear back from, perhaps even Jen Bekman, the Founder herself.

Alas.

Crickets.

I never even received  the obligatory form letter from HR informing me my cover letter was brazen or cocky and  I was wildly unqualified, a poor match or that they had chosen another candidate. Zilch, just silence. I  kicked some dirt and chalked up the cover letter as an excellent creative writing exercise and went on with my life.

That was until a few weeks later while I was obsessively checking their list of employees to see who got the gig I’d applied for. To my shock, I found the 20×200 site to be offline. (A simple but vague message let us know to — “Stay Tuned: We’re taking stock and making updates” )

One cannot speculate to the reasoning why I never did hear back, but after learning 20×200 was taking a moment of silence after reportedly earning $15 million in revenue was enough for me to quit pouting. I was not only an eager applicant, I was also a collector of 20×200 art and admirer of their mission. Please see my Don Oehl illustration of Anna + Karl (clearly I had to have this after my Halloween costume.)

But it’s happy days! 20×200 is back from hiatus with its art for everyone mission.  20×200 believes that everyone can–and should–collect art, and that artists should have more opportunities to make a living by making work.

Amen. Echo, echo, echo to that.

Without further ado, I picked a few stunners from the newly minted site and like my Don Oehl Wintorfeld print that proudly hangs in our bedroom entrance you can add a black or white frame for just a few bucks more.  Each piece is also carefully packaged with an artist-signed and numbered certificate of authenticity.

this is my favorite for obvious reasons: flowers! Mille-Fleurs by Brea Souders

For obvious reasons, this is my favorite: flowers! Mille-Fleurs by Brea Souders.   Souders’ work has been featured in New York Magazine, Vice, DEAR DAVE, Real Simple, and Creative Review.

Assignment by Clare Grill

Assignment by Clare Grill

Oddly enough, I think I know this guy. Sloane, is that you? "Nice Pants" by Landon Nordeman

Oddly enough, I think I know this guy. Matt Sloane, is that you? “Nice Pants” by Landon Nordeman.  Most of these prints are sold out (not the pants.)

Craig Damrauer is presenting One Dozen Instructions at the Unnoticed Art Festival. The event will take place at a city in the Netherlands at a completely unannounced time. So that may be a little bit hard to find.

This should be printed in every contemporary museum from here to Madagascar.  Seriously, if I have to overhear one more conversation about how you could have made that… WELL YOU DIDN’T, now did you? Artist, Craig Damrauer spells it out perfectly here in his “You Should Buy Art.”  Craig is presenting One Dozen Instructions at the Unnoticed Art Festival. The event will take place at a city in the Netherlands at a completely unannounced time.  So that may be a little bit hard to find.

That sky, that grass. This scene.  "My photographic work deals with the strange, makeshift, and often imperfect ways in which man and nature relate to one another."  It certainly does as this piece shows.   Behind the Bay City Log Sorting Yard, Cosmopolis, Washington by Eirik Johnson

That sky, that grass. This scene. “My photographic work deals with the strange, makeshift, and often imperfect ways in which man and nature relate to one another.” It certainly does as this piece shows. Behind the Bay City Log Sorting Yard, Cosmopolis, Washington by Eirik Johnson

how perfect would any of Sharon Montrose's baby animal series be for a nursery. The pink flamingo, the baby deer, the little monkey! It reminds me of the Andrew Zuckerman series Creature, but with softer, sweeter creatures.

how perfect would any of Sharon Montrose’s baby animal series be for a nursery. The pink flamingo, the baby deer, the little monkey! It reminds me of the Andrew Zuckerman series Creature, but with softer, sweeter creatures.

Welcome back 20×200! And if you’re reading this Jen Bekman,  don’t worry about my application, I’m gainfully employed and incredibly happy you’re back on the internet helping artists create and collectors create.

You can see all the 20×200 artists here, a few might even look familiar.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Art, gifts, leisure, Lifestyle

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